Difference between pages "Information for Speakers" and "ClsXlca2015 behaviour"

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(What is problem behaviour?)
 
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== Speaker Information Pack ==
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Behaviour
Most questions for Speakers are answered in the
+
  
[[Speaker Information Pack]]
 
  
The key things you need to know are;
+
== Problem behaviour strategies ==
  
* Your presentation should be in 16:9 ratio (resolution can vary, but must be in 16:9 ratio)
 
* All rooms except Wool Museum will have HDMI connectors. Wool Museum will have VGA connectors. Adaptors will be provided, but bring your own if you have one.
 
  
== Presentation template ==
 
You're not required at all to use this Presentation Template, but it's here if you need one (LibreOffice Impress template, .odt format)
 
[[File:Speaker-template-lca2016.otp]]
 
  
== What are the guidelines for giving a presentation at linux.conf.au? ==
+
=== What we want to get out of this ===
Your presentation format is entirely up to you.
+
  
We expect that you'll be presenting from your own laptop, but if this is an issue please get in touch with your [[Speaker Liaison]] and we can make alternate arrangements. We usually ask for presentation material after the conference so that it can be made available.
 
  
 +
Many haven't had to deal much with problem behaviours much, and would like to learn how, particularly those who can't necessarily be told they're a problem.
  
Each presentation slot is 50 minutes, except tutorials which have a double slot of one hour and 40 minutes. It is expected that your talk will go for approximately 40 minutes, with 10 minutes for questions, unless you prefer to take questions during your presentation. For tutorials, it is assumed that questions will be asked during the tutorial rather than at the end. Room monitors will be stationed in each conference room and will help guide you
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Code of conduct enforcement
with timing and identifying questions from the audience. You will need to have practiced beforehand however to ensure that you don't go significantly over or under time.
+
  
 +
Dealing successfully with problem behaviours that manifest across professional and personal boundaries.
  
''NOTE: When answering questions, we request that you repeat the question for the benefit of the recording and for the audience.''
 
  
== What facilities are there in the presentation venues? ==
+
=== Open discussion ===
  
These are outlined in the [[Speaker Information Pack]].
 
  
If you have special requirements for your presentation, please make contact with your [[Speaker Liaison]].
 
  
== What is the Schwag Bag and what's in it? ==
+
==== What is problem behaviour? ====
  
[[Schwag Bag]]
 
  
{{Template:Events}}
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* Code of conduct violation
 +
* Refusal to admit you've done something wrong
 +
* Anything preventing communal growth and causing conflict
  
{{Template:VisaRequirements}}
+
Would be interesting to deal with this by putting yourself in the shoes of the person exhibiting that behaviour. They might feel they're doing the right thing despite others' opinions because they were so absolutely confident.
  
== Will the conference be recorded and streamed? ==
+
Community management vs affecting somebody's livelihood; we want to leave out discussion of the latter.
  
Yes. All sessions in the conference are recorded and streamed, unless you declined permission for recording during Registration. If you have any concerns about streaming and recording, please contact your [[Speaker Liaison]].
+
Dealing with somebody who has extremely positive effects on a community, but also has negative effects. Write a document that says how to deal with certain issues, and convey that to the problem person.
  
== Will I be picked up at the airport? ==
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Focus on solutions rather than complaining about problems.
  
Yes, if you arrive on 31st January at Melbourne Tullamarine (MEL) or Avalon (AVV).  
+
People behaving inappropriately often don't realising, and the first step is to identify that problem to the individual; lack of self-awareness.
  
We need to know who's arriving when so please make sure your details are entered on the [[Airport arrivals and departures page]].
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Often any given behaviour isn't bad enough to provoke somebody to do anything about it.
  
Also see [[Transport]].
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Monkey, banana, water spray, ladder. (google it) http://johnstepper.com/2013/10/26/the-five-monkeys-experiment-with-a-new-lesson/
  
==What's to eat?==
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Educate newcomers to how things are done around here, but be open to new ideas from newcomers as well.
  
See [[Food]].
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BDSM community, [[http://pervocracy.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/missing-stair.html broken staircase web post]].
  
{{Template:WhatToPack}}
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Having a code of conduct or other framework goes a long way to making the problem easier to deal with.
  
{{Template:Navigation}}
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Act like gravity when enforcing boundaries; gravity doesn't care why you fell, but the consequence is the same.
 +
 
 +
People need to look at the *intent* of a code of conduct, rather than necessarily take it literally, and not all people do this.
 +
 
 +
Code of conduct is a good way to turn away trouble people at the door.
 +
 
 +
==== What has worked for you ====
 +
 
 +
 
 +
Discussing the issues with the person, possibly privately, and possibly publicly. Having open discussions all the time decreases the tension and makes people more comfortable to have these discussions more often.
 +
 
 +
Having an idea where you want the conversation to start and end really helps with preventing the discussion from being derailed. Also rehearsing that discussion in your head beforehand.
 +
 
 +
Some people want to avoid conflict at all cost.
 +
 
 +
If you can't separate the behaviour and the person, it makes it easier to tell that person that they're no longer welcome. If, however, there's a chance the person can change, then they can be welcome as long as they don't exhibit that behaviour.
 +
 
 +
Wanting to be an accepting community for people with mental disabilities makes it really difficult to accept that the person can't be accepted.
 +
 
 +
Some people have mental disabilities, some are just willfully unpleasant, and some are both. When somebody is both, things are difficult.
 +
 
 +
Some people with disabilities are incorrectly treated, and it's hard to identify.
 +
 
 +
Many people with disabilities externalise the blame and as such get what they want from the community in the community's attempt to be accepting of all.
 +
 
 +
Need to be confident in having a solution, and being willing to take the repercussions. This is made easier by having a code of conduct or similar (such as the white ribbon) that you stick to that says "I won't be silent about this; I will stand up and do something about it"
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
==== Advice for past self ====
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
Have a clear decision on what behaviour is acceptable and how you respond to something that isn't acceptable.
 +
 
 +
Raising issues as early as possible; don't be silent, because often the person just needs the issue to be raised.
 +
 
 +
Have policies and processes before incidents occur.
 +
 
 +
Discuss early with other community organisers on perceived issues and possible solutions.
 +
 
 +
When you have a conversation about troubling behaviour, ensure the conversation ends in an action plan.
 +
 
 +
The community learns by the slow process, so it's often not possible to deal with an issue quickly, but hopefully we can learn from past conflicts and deal quicker with similar conflicts next time.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[category: CLSXLCA]]

Revision as of 18:47, 23 January 2016

Behaviour


Problem behaviour strategies

What we want to get out of this

Many haven't had to deal much with problem behaviours much, and would like to learn how, particularly those who can't necessarily be told they're a problem.

Code of conduct enforcement

Dealing successfully with problem behaviours that manifest across professional and personal boundaries.


Open discussion

What is problem behaviour?

  • Code of conduct violation
  • Refusal to admit you've done something wrong
  • Anything preventing communal growth and causing conflict

Would be interesting to deal with this by putting yourself in the shoes of the person exhibiting that behaviour. They might feel they're doing the right thing despite others' opinions because they were so absolutely confident.

Community management vs affecting somebody's livelihood; we want to leave out discussion of the latter.

Dealing with somebody who has extremely positive effects on a community, but also has negative effects. Write a document that says how to deal with certain issues, and convey that to the problem person.

Focus on solutions rather than complaining about problems.

People behaving inappropriately often don't realising, and the first step is to identify that problem to the individual; lack of self-awareness.

Often any given behaviour isn't bad enough to provoke somebody to do anything about it.

Monkey, banana, water spray, ladder. (google it) http://johnstepper.com/2013/10/26/the-five-monkeys-experiment-with-a-new-lesson/

Educate newcomers to how things are done around here, but be open to new ideas from newcomers as well.

BDSM community, [broken staircase web post].

Having a code of conduct or other framework goes a long way to making the problem easier to deal with.

Act like gravity when enforcing boundaries; gravity doesn't care why you fell, but the consequence is the same.

People need to look at the *intent* of a code of conduct, rather than necessarily take it literally, and not all people do this.

Code of conduct is a good way to turn away trouble people at the door.

What has worked for you

Discussing the issues with the person, possibly privately, and possibly publicly. Having open discussions all the time decreases the tension and makes people more comfortable to have these discussions more often.

Having an idea where you want the conversation to start and end really helps with preventing the discussion from being derailed. Also rehearsing that discussion in your head beforehand.

Some people want to avoid conflict at all cost.

If you can't separate the behaviour and the person, it makes it easier to tell that person that they're no longer welcome. If, however, there's a chance the person can change, then they can be welcome as long as they don't exhibit that behaviour.

Wanting to be an accepting community for people with mental disabilities makes it really difficult to accept that the person can't be accepted.

Some people have mental disabilities, some are just willfully unpleasant, and some are both. When somebody is both, things are difficult.

Some people with disabilities are incorrectly treated, and it's hard to identify.

Many people with disabilities externalise the blame and as such get what they want from the community in the community's attempt to be accepting of all.

Need to be confident in having a solution, and being willing to take the repercussions. This is made easier by having a code of conduct or similar (such as the white ribbon) that you stick to that says "I won't be silent about this; I will stand up and do something about it"


Advice for past self

Have a clear decision on what behaviour is acceptable and how you respond to something that isn't acceptable.

Raising issues as early as possible; don't be silent, because often the person just needs the issue to be raised.

Have policies and processes before incidents occur.

Discuss early with other community organisers on perceived issues and possible solutions.

When you have a conversation about troubling behaviour, ensure the conversation ends in an action plan.

The community learns by the slow process, so it's often not possible to deal with an issue quickly, but hopefully we can learn from past conflicts and deal quicker with similar conflicts next time.